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Blog // Connect Michigan

Local Churches Receive Free Internet

By Eric Frederick

Broadband adoption rates in rural Michigan households have caught up to the national average, rising from 50% in 2010, up to 71% in 2013. Connect Michigan, local and state governments, economic development groups, and Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are all cooperating to get more of these unserved or underserved areas on the broadband map. Telecommunications cooperative Allband exemplifies this cooperative spirit in rural northeast Michigan with its donation of fiber Internet capabilities to local community institutions. Two churches in Lachine, MI and one in Mikado, MI are now receiving fiber Internet through Allband, providing the first...

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The Two-Way Super Highway: Upload and Download Speeds

By Eric Frederick

Whether you're watching a movie, sending an e-mail, posting a tweet, or reading an e-book, you're interacting online using a two-way connection. What you put out and what comes to you, and the speed with which it is sent and delivered, is determined by the speed of your Internet connection. Traditionally, as the web has commonly been used as a one-way medium for viewing, reading, and watching, download speeds have been at the forefront of attention. Most Internet Service Providers (ISP) characterize Internet quality by the download speed provided. However, as more users are producing content, as well as viewing it, upload speeds are becoming...

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Building Rural Broadband From the Ground Up

By Eric Frederick

When John Reigle found out he couldn't get the telephone service he was promised to his new home and home-based business in rural Northeast Michigan, he decided to take a bold step. He started his own telecommunications company. In the 1990's, Reigle relocated to rural Northeast Michigan with assurances that the nearby telephone provider would connect his new home. After his home was built, he learned that connecting the location—like many other homes in the area—was impossible. Surrounded by forests, lakes, and farms, with few towns and no major cities, the area was completely cut off, lacking even resources to make 911 emergency calls. The...

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